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What is your date of birth? (dd/mm/yyyy)    Your National Minimum Wage depends on your age. At present, the rates are:
  • 25 and over: £P1 per hour (also known as the National Living Wage)
  • 21 to 24: £P2 per hour
  • 18 to 20: £P3 per hour
  • Under 18: £P4 per hour
Knowing your date of birth will allow us calculate what you should have been paid more accurately.

N.B. Just put in the numbers and enter a '0' before single digits e.g. 01/01/2017

Are you an apprentice? If you are an apprentice you may only be entitled to the lower apprentice rate of pay. This will depend on your age and how long you have been an apprentice.

When did your apprenticeship start? (dd/mm/yyyy)
  
Just put in the numbers and enter a '0' before single digits e.g. 01/01/2017

Are you in any of the following groups?
an agricultural worker
a member of the armed forces
a member of your employer’s family who lives in the employer’s home
not a member of your employers family, but someone who lives in your employer’s home, shares in the family’s life and leisure activities and is not charged rent or for meals?
on an education work placement or work experience?
on a government employment programme, e.g. the Work Programme, a government pre-apprenticeship scheme, or a Jobcentre Plus Work trial?
on an EU programme: Leonardo da Vinci, Youth in Action, Erasmus, Comenius?
none of the above

How often were you paid?




When did your last pay reference period end? (dd/mm/yyyy)
  
For example, if you work Monday to Friday and are paid every Monday for the previous week, your last pay reference period ended last Friday. If you are paid monthly in arrears at the end of each month, it was the last day of last month.

Just put in the numbers and enter a '0' before single digits e.g. 01/01/2017

What pay reference period that you are concerned you didn't receive NMW for?





If you are concerned about multiple pay reference period, pick the one you would like to consider first.

Would you like to consider a different pay reference period?



How many hours did you work in this pay period?  
All hours that you were at work, working, should be counted.
Travel time while you’re at work, for example travelling between one site and another should also be counted. Travel to and from your normal place of work should not.
If you do on call work or sleep at your place of work, you should include any hours that you are awake and directly working for your employer. Do not include hours where you are present at work, but not actively working. Making this distinction can be complicated and difficult, so if you are unsure you may want to seek further advice.

This is also an area of law that has changed recently, following a decision by the Court of Appeal in a case called Mencap v Tomlinson-Blake. That decision may be challenged in the Supreme Court, which might change the law again. If you do a significant amount of on call work you may want to seek further legal advice.

Did you do any on call work or sleep at your place of work?

Do you wish to add additional hours? On call work and sleeping at your place at work can create complicated issues in relation to the National Minimum Wage. You may wish to obtain more advice.

But, in general, any time that you actually working, for example, because you have been called or woken to deal with a work situation or task, will count as time worked for these purposes.

However, time at the work place, but not physically performing tasks or even asleep, may also count if your availability or presence amounts to you carrying out your duties. For example, a nurse who sleeps in the next room to an elderly and very vulnerable patient, in order to be immediately available if they awake confused, is probably working throughout that night. A pub landlord who is provided with a room over the pub is not working through the night (unless there are exceptional and highly unusual circumstances).

How many additional hours did you work during this period?   On call work and sleeping at your place at work can create complicated issues in relation to the National Minimum Wage. You may wish to obtain more advice.
But, in general, any time that you actually working, for example, because you have been called or woken to deal with a work situation or task, will count as time worked for these purposes.
However, time at the work place, but not physically performing tasks or even asleep, may also count if your availability or presence amounts to you carrying out your duties. For example, a nurse who sleeps in the next room to an elderly and very vulnerable patient, in order to be immediately available if they awake confused, is probably working throughout that night. A pub landlord who is provided with a room over the pub is not working through the night (unless there are exceptional and highly unusual circumstances).

How much were you paid in relation to this pay reference period? £    Although this might seem like a simple question, it can be a little complicated. This is because people are often paid in relation to one pay reference period during a different pay reference period.

It is very common, for example, to be paid immediately after a pay reference period ends, i.e. in the next pay reference period. Such payments may well count towards the earlier pay reference period, even though they are received in a later one. At the same time, if pay is delayed too long, it will no longer count in relation to the pay reference period during which the work was done, although it will count towards the pay reference period during which is was received.

We need to know:

  • How much you were paid between P1 for work you did during that same period
  • How much you were paid between P2 that related to work you did between P1
  • How much you were paid between P1 which either
    • doesn’t relate to any particular hours of work at all, or
    • relates to work done before P3
Note that all of these amounts should be gross, i.e. before tax is deducted. You should not include any expenses your employer has reimbursed you.

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Has there been a deduction for payment of a loan or overpayment of pay in relation to this pay reference period?
No, there has been no deduction of this type
Yes, the figure of £P1 included a deduction of £  
in relation to a loan / wages overpayment
Yes, the figure of £P1 did not include a deduction of £  
in relation to a loan / wages overpayment
You have told us that you were paid £P1 in relation to this pay period.
If there has been a deduction from your pay before that figure in order to repay a loan or to repay a previous overpayment of your pay, this will need to be included in the final figure for your pay. In effect, you have received the benefit of this money, because it has reduced your loan or the amount you owe your employer because of the overpayment, even though you have not received the money directly.

Do you receive an enhanced hourly rate for working at a particular time, for example evening overtime or working weekends? Enhanced hourly rates do not count for the purposes of payments for the national minimum wage. For example, an employee who is paid £7 an hour, but £9 on weekends, will be considered as if they are paid £7 an hour at the weekend.

Note that this is different to an employee who does different work at different times. For example, someone who is working as a general labourer during the week at £7 and a plasterer at the weekends at £9 is not receiving an enhanced rate — they are doing two different jobs at two different rates.

How many hours did you work at an enhanced hourly rate between P1?  

What was the enhanced hourly rate? £  

What is your normal hourly rate? £   

Were you paid more than one enhanced hourly rate?

Please fill in the following boxes on the number of hours worked and the rate paid for those hours hours            rate
      £ 

      £ 

      £ 

      £ 

      £ 


Does your employer provide you with accommodation?

How many days did they provide accommodation between P1? days  

Does your employer charge you for accommodation?

What did they charge you for accommodation between P1? £   
Your employer is allowed to charge for your accommodation if that is part of your agreement. But when looking at the minimum wage there is a fixed accommodation offset, currently £P1 per day. If you have been charged more than this the difference will be deducted from the pay you are considered to have received.

For example, Mohammed works for 7 hours a day at £8 per hour. His employer provides accommodation and charges him £20 a day for this. In cash terms, Mohammed is being paid £36 a day. His employer might well argue that the value of his accommodation is much more than £20. When we look at the National Minimum Wage, however, Mohammed is considered to be paid £36 plus £P1 (fixed accommodation offset) or £43 total. Since he is working 7 hours a day, this is an average of £6.14 — significantly below the NMW.

You have now finished this question sequence. Now press Calculate


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